Sanitation and the Bible

 
Here are some rules of Sanitation found in the Bible:“All the days wherein the plague shall be in him he shall be defiled; he is unclean: he shall dwell alone; without the camp shall his habitation be.” (Leviticus 13:46, KJV)

Early in the Middle Ages, the dreaded disease leprosy had killed countless millions of people; and later the Black Death took another sixty million. Not until the physicians of the day gave up leadership to religion was the plague brought under control. The church took as its guiding principle the concept of contagion as embodied in the Old Testament, Leviticus.

“You shall set off a place outside the camp and, when you go out; and you shall have an implement among your equipment, and when you sit down outside, you shall dig with it and turn and cover your refuse.” (Deuteronomy 23:12,13, KJV)

Up to the close of the eighteenth century, hygienic provisions, even in the great capitals, were quite primitive. It was the rule for excrement to be dumped into the streets that were unpaved and filthy. Powerful stenches gripped villages and cities. It was a heyday for flies as they bred in the filth and spread intestinal diseases that killed millions. Diseases such as cholera, dysentery, and typhoid fever could have easily been controlled by following God’s provision in Deuteronomy. A medical historian writes that this directive is “certainly a primitive measure, but an effective one, which indicates advanced ideas of sanitation.”

“He who touches the dead body of anyone shall be unclean seven days. … Whoever touches the body of anyone who has died, and does not purify himself, defiles the tabernacle of the Lord. That person shall be cut off from Israel. He shall be unclean, because the water of purification was not sprinkled on him; his uncleanness is still on him. … The clean person shall sprinkle the unclean on the third day and on the seventh day he shall purify himself, wash his clothes, and bathe in water; and at evening he shall be clean…” (Numbers 19:11-22)

If physicians only followed the above instructions early in history many lives would have been saved. It was not until 1847, when Dr. Semmelweis wrote a book about hand-washing and changing clothes after doing autopsies and surgeries before going to the next patient. When his rules were followed mortality dropped by 80 percent.

Many centuries before Semmelweis, however, God gave to Moses detailed instructions on the safest method for cleansing the hands after handling the infected living. Proper modern method for washing hands is “The hands should be vigorously lathered and rubbed together for at least 15 seconds under a moderate-sized stream of water..

The scriptural method specified not merely washing in a basin, but repeated washing in running water with time intervals allowed for drying and exposure to sun to kill bacteria not washed off. The soap used is even more remarkable. It was made by burning together in a fire the following: a young cow, cedar wood, hyssop branches, and scarlet wool. The washing solution contained an irritant, cedar-wood oil, that would encourage scrubbing; an antiseptic, hyssop oil, that would kill bacteria and fungi; and a scrubbing element, wool fibers, that would dislodge the bacteria. Even today, hospitals often use a similar granular soap because it is difficult to remove granular soap from the hands in less than 15 seconds.

 
 
 
Here are some rules of Sanitation found in the Bible:“All the days wherein the plague shall be in him he shall be defiled; he is unclean: he shall dwell alone; without the camp shall his habitation be.” (Leviticus 13:46, KJV)

Early in the Middle Ages, the dreaded disease leprosy had killed countless millions of people; and later the Black Death took another sixty million. Not until the physicians of the day gave up leadership to religion was the plague brought under control. The church took as its guiding principle the concept of contagion as embodied in the Old Testament, Leviticus.

“You shall set off a place outside the camp and, when you go out; and you shall have an implement among your equipment, and when you sit down outside, you shall dig with it and turn and cover your refuse.” (Deuteronomy 23:12,13, KJV)

Up to the close of the eighteenth century, hygienic provisions, even in the great capitals, were quite primitive. It was the rule for excrement to be dumped into the streets that were unpaved and filthy. Powerful stenches gripped villages and cities. It was a heyday for flies as they bred in the filth and spread intestinal diseases that killed millions. Diseases such as cholera, dysentery, and typhoid fever could have easily been controlled by following God’s provision in Deuteronomy. A medical historian writes that this directive is “certainly a primitive measure, but an effective one, which indicates advanced ideas of sanitation.”

“He who touches the dead body of anyone shall be unclean seven days. … Whoever touches the body of anyone who has died, and does not purify himself, defiles the tabernacle of the Lord. That person shall be cut off from Israel. He shall be unclean, because the water of purification was not sprinkled on him; his uncleanness is still on him. … The clean person shall sprinkle the unclean on the third day and on the seventh day he shall purify himself, wash his clothes, and bathe in water; and at evening he shall be clean…” (Numbers 19:11-22)

If physicians only followed the above instructions early in history many lives would have been saved. It was not until 1847, when Dr. Semmelweis wrote a book about hand-washing and changing clothes after doing autopsies and surgeries before going to the next patient. When his rules were followed mortality dropped by 80 percent.

Many centuries before Semmelweis, however, God gave to Moses detailed instructions on the safest method for cleansing the hands after handling the infected living. Proper modern method for washing hands is “The hands should be vigorously lathered and rubbed together for at least 15 seconds under a moderate-sized stream of water..

The scriptural method specified not merely washing in a basin, but repeated washing in running water with time intervals allowed for drying and exposure to sun to kill bacteria not washed off. The soap used is even more remarkable. It was made by burning together in a fire the following: a young cow, cedar wood, hyssop branches, and scarlet wool. The washing solution contained an irritant, cedar-wood oil, that would encourage scrubbing; an antiseptic, hyssop oil, that would kill bacteria and fungi; and a scrubbing element, wool fibers, that would dislodge the bacteria. Even today, hospitals often use a similar granular soap because it is difficult to remove granular soap from the hands in less than 15 seconds.

IF YOU HAVE QUESTION TO ASK REGARDING FAITH OR ANYTHING!

YOU BETTER ASK BROTHER ELISEO F. SORIANO KNOWN AS

THE MOST CONTROVERSIAL AND SENSIBLE PREACHER IN OUR TIMEaskbroeli_podcast2-final_4wp2final2copyright.jpg

These are the steps to tune in to the podcast:

1. log on to www.talkshoe.com

2. create your own account

3. after installing the talkshoe software, click “LIVE NOW” tab

4. look for Brother Eli’s podcast entitled “The Brother Eli Soriano Truth Pod

5. click on “listen, chat, and talk”

*please be advised that it is a must that everyone who will be calling in the podshow should be wearing a headset to avoid feedbacks and echoes.

Happy listening!

 

~ by truth Lover on October 30, 2007.

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